The Truth About Wind and Fishing

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The Truth About Wind and Fishing

The Truth About Wind and Fishing

Wind from the east, fish bite the least;
Wind from the west, the fish bite the best;
Wind from the north, few sailors set forth;
Wind from the south blows bait in their mouth.
I’ve heard variations of this old fishing rhyme at least a thousand times since I was a kid. While it’s not always correct, the little proverb is a good predictor for fishing trips across most of the U.S.
The wind direction does not cause fish to bite, however the reason for the wind direction often does. For instance, an east wind usually blows after a big cold front. An immediate drop in water temperature is a shock to your entire aquatic ecosystem, especially the bottom for the food chain, so it really should not be surprising that this is basically the kiss of death for catching fish. A west wind, on the other hand, usually happens prior to a storm hits. Sensing the changing conditions, fish often carry on a binge prior to the leading, which makes when it comes to awesome fishing stories we remember so well. The north wind can also be linked to the aforementioned cold front, and no matter what the fishing, cold air and big waves make most boaters think twice about heading out. Finally, south winds blow during warm-ups within the spring and fall, or stable weather through the summer, each of which are normally agreeable to your fishermen therefore the fish.
Another old saying is the fact that wind is the fisherman's friend.” I have a tendency to agree with this. A little bit of chop on the water reduces the visibility underwater, so fish can't readily see the flaws in your bait. Furthermore, the wave action across the shore often stirs within the bottom associated with the food chain, giving the major fish a reason to feed. Therefore, I'll take an east wind or a north wind over no wind.
Wind has more advantages than undesireable effects on fish behavior.
Listed are among the advantages.
Let the wind become your friend.
Don't lose concentrate on the undeniable fact that fishing in high winds is dangerous. High wind conditions can make Lake Wind Advisories with waves large enough to swamp your boat while making fishing impossible. There may likely fewer fishermen around that will help you should you obtain in trouble. Make certain someone knows where you stand in the event of a crisis. Know and practice safe boating rules.
  • Wind Restricts Light Penetration:
    Choppy wave action created by wind cuts down on light penetration, normally improving fishing.
  • Wind Oxygenates the Water:
    This can be a major plus, especially during the hot water months when dissolved oxygen levels are low.
  • Wind Creates Clarity Edges
    Bass are attracted to places where  off colored water lines form. The mud line.
  • Wind Often Affects Water Temperature:
  • Wind Creates Currents:
    Stronger winds can create current areas such as around bridges, between islands, across shallow to deep areas, and deep to shallow areas. Fish are attracted to current areas, because they usually have more food, sometimes better water temperatures, and often increased oxygen supplies.
  • Wind Drifts Plankton:
    During the warm months when a bloom exists on or near the surface, wind currents push plankton blooms, so shad and minnows, which are filter feeders, follow. This in turn draws in bigger fish.
  • Wind Can Reposition Bass:
    It can move bass from deeper depths to shallower depths. It can make fish more aggressive on wind swept areas and can move them from thick cover out into open areas to feed.
  • Winds Stirs up the Shallows:
    Wave action stirs up the shallow floor of a lake dislodging food particles from various objects like wood, rock and vegetation. This attracts bait fish, and of course, the big fish folow!

A wind advisory means that winds will cause waves on area waters large enough to capsize or swamp boats. Smaller boats especially.  Normally a wind advisory is issued by the national weather service when substained winds are expected to be  20 to 25 MPH or gust of  30 to 40 MPH are expected. Boaters in the advisory area should avoid open water and stay close to shore or in wind protected inlets.


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